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vocal field cricket

Gryllus vocalis Scudder 1901

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map lectotype male lectotype male male
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male male female  
11 s of calling song, male from San Diego County, Calif., 23.5°C. Dominant frequency 3.6 kHz. Recording by D. B. Weissman (S97-60, R97-71); used by permission. Click on sound bar to hear entire recording.
This sound spectrogram is a 2 s excerpt of the 11 s audio file accessible above. The excerpt begins at 3 s. Click on sound bar to hear graphed song.
spectrogram
30 s of calling, from San Diego County, Calif., 23.5°C. Dominant frequency 3.7 kHz. Recording by D.B. Weissman (S09-18, R-09-17); used by permission. Click on sound bar to hear entire recording.
This sound spectrogram is a 10 s excerpt of the 30 s audio file accessible immediately above. The excerpt begins at 1 s. Click on sound bar to hear graphed song.
spectrogram
Sound spectrogram showing first 8 chirps of 10 s sample immediately above. Click on sound bar to hear graphed song.
spectrogram
Song: Weissman et al. (1980) described the song as having 2 to 3 pulses per chirp produced at a rate of 25 to 42 per sec and averaging 220 chirps per minute at 25°C.
Identification: From coastal California to Owens Valley down to the Mojave desert, head, pronotum, and tegmina are dark. East of Owens Valley and the Mojave desert, heads and pronotum dark and tegmina light colored. A key to the adult males of native US Gryllus is in Weissman and Gray (2019).
DNA: Gryllus vocalis is sister species to G. cohni. For more information about DNA testing, see Weissman and Gray (2019).
Similar species: Gryllus cohni's song is an irregular trill while G. vocalis' song is evenly delivered 3 pulse chirps that are not grouped in trills.
Range: From Big Bend, Texas to southern California, north along the eastern side of the Sierras, then looping back to Big Bend by passing through southwestern Nevada, southern Utah, Arizona, and most of New Mexico.
Habitat: Salt and freshwater marshes, irrigated gardens, streams, and ponds.
Life cycle: One to two generations per year depending on location. No egg diapause.
Season: Late winter to early spring with some populations persisting into late summer into winter.
Remarks: Males tend to sing under dense vegetation making it difficult to collect even though they are easy to approach. Because this species tends to congregate under rocks and other items, checking such places may result in a capture. Oatmeal trails can be used as well.
Name derivation: Latin: "voco" means "call"; probably in reference to the loudness and fast pulse rate of the calling song.
More information:
subfamily Gryllinae, genus Gryllus
References: Weissman and Gray 2019
More information:
subfamily Gryllinae, genus Gryllus
Nomenclature: OSF (Orthoptera Species File Online)
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